Composer of the Week: John Adams

John Adams is an incredibly awesome San Francisco Bay Area-based composer. You also may have noticed that many of my posts on Twitter are labeled with the #JohnAdamsFanClub hash tag.  I may be biased, but either way, his music is fantastic. b. Feb. 15, 1947 in Worcester, MA John Adams graduated from Concord High School in Concord, NH and went on to earn two degrees at Harvard. New England composers and the New England composition style

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Composer of the Week: Aaron Copland

b. November 14, 1900, Brooklyn, NY d. December 2, 1990, North Tarrytown, NY Aaron Copland was a famed American composer and an accomplished pianist. He was known as the “Dean of American Composers.” His composition style was a unique hybrid of American folk idioms and modern classical music and is identified by his iconic use of percussive orchestration, changing meter, polyrhythms, polychords and tone rows. Many of Copland’s works incorporated slowly changing harmonies that aptly

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Composer of the Week: Charles Ives

b. 1874   Danbury, Connecticut d. 1954   New York, NY Charles Ives was a super-cool, trail-blazing composer who also had a successful career as an insurance salesman. He’s our composer of the week! Charles Ives grew up in Danbury, Connecticut, where his father, George Ives, worked as a music teacher and band leader. George Ives had a tremendous impact on young Charles’ musical development from the very beginning, teaching him to engage in inventive thought when

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July is here. Happy American Composers Month!

Yes! Today is the kickoff of Salon97’s American Composers Month. Our classical trivia text message today (sign up for free in the red box on the right-hand sidebar!) highlighted John Philip Sousa, so we thought it only appropriate to include a video of one of his marches. “The Washington Post” was written as a tribute to the newspaper by the same name and gained worldwide popularity when listeners realized the piece had the perfect beat

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