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4.5 Ways to Explore Bach’s Goldberg Variations

For our March event in San Francisco, we held a group viewing of “32 Short Films About Glenn Gould.” The movie is an odd collection of vignettes and is very fitting for such an iconoclastic person. Prior to researching this film and Glenn Gould himself, I’d spent shockingly little time thinking about/listening to Bach’s Goldberg Variations, a collection that is commonly associated with Glenn Gould’s name and virtuosity. We discussed Gould’s life, the Goldbergs, and

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This Week’s Trivia: J.S. Bach

This week’s trivia SMS informed that J.S. Bach was imprisoned in 1717. What could he possibly have done wrong? Oh, he just got a new job, that’s all. His soon-to-be-former employer, the Duke of Weimar wanted nothing of it and tossed Bach in the slammer. Bach made good use of the time, however–he spent the month imprisoned working on Book One of the Well-tempered Clavier. Here’s a segment of Well-tempered Clavier, Book 1, No. 2

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Bach and My Father

Last week my dear friend Holly shared a poem she came across in Writer’s Almanac. Its simple beauty speaks for itself, and I wanted to share it with all of you. Bach and My Father by Paul Zimmer Six days a week my father sold shoes To support our family through depression and war, Nursed his wife through years of Parkinson’s, Loved nominal cigars, manhattans, long jokes, Never kissed me, but always shook my hand.

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Composer of the Week: J.S. Bach

In honor of Fantasia‘s upcoming 70th anniversary, we’re giving a shout out to composers featured in the film all month long. Take it away, J.S. Bach! b. March 21, 1685 in Eisenach, Germany d. July 28, 1750 in Leipzig, Germany J.S. Bach was — and is — famous for his organ works, choral works and sacred compositions. His music remains a staple in performed music literature as well as musical study for almost every musician

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